REVIEW: If These Trees Could Talk – ‘Red Forest’

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In order to excite fans and build anticipation for their third full length album, slated for release this fall, If These Trees Could Talk are reissuing their sophomore effort “Red Forest”. After it’s initial release in 2012 the critically acclaimed album has been featured in a myriad of media outlets and was followed up with a sold out European tour.

Virtually closing in on the sublime, tracks such as “They Speak With Knives” give this record it’s shine. Dancing along the fret board in a language that transcends words, this uniquely emotive gem calls to mind the intangible qualities that distinguished their first album.

Title track “Red Forest” is the second longest track on the album, finishing just short of eight and a half minutes however it presents the first instance of a genuinely dynamic song. The voyage through crescendos leading to emotional climaxes and decrescendos guiding the listener to introspective lows, gives this track an effortless ebb and flow that proved to be an emotive highlight.

Fans who are familiar with the ethereal sound of Explosions In The Sky and the vibrant magic of Tides Of Man may find themselves at home in the familiar atmosphere of this record. And while I can appreciate that reverb and delay are factors in the formation of their sound it feels as though they rely on it too often, leaning on lengthy stretches of monotonous composition which ultimately diminishing what potential there was to be found in numerous places.

All in all while there were a smattering of songs on this album I fiercely enjoyed, they were eclipsed by those I did not. Repetition and a failure to progress and remain consistent were the largest setbacks. At times it seemed as though some tracks were not given adequate time to develop their own identity before being whittled into something more uniform. Despite it’s shortcoming the tracks that were able to stand out made lasting impressions and should be considered among the best work they have done to date.