REVIEW: Circuitry – ‘Self Titled’

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Hailing from Long Branch, NJ Circuitry formed after the dissolution of progressive metal band Dark Empire. Their style is best described as an eclectic mix of various metal subgenres, with a majority of influence coming from djent and metalcore. Circuitry released their debut self-titled album in November of 2014, and have been building their name and sharpening their teeth ever since, even earning themselves a feature on It Djents.

Beginning with chaotic numbers such as “The One Who Knocks” and “Safe Words”, it’s not hard to see why these tracks would translate to crowd pleasing live performances. A spirited showing from the three piece outfit ensures that at the very least they will hold your attention. Vocalist Joel Monet smooth transitions between singing and an all-growl gives texture to these songs. While guitarist Christian Colabelli spearheads the tracks with dynamic riffs that give definition and direction. Of the two “Safe Words” is particularly memorable for it’s utilization of progressive instrumentation and catchy lyrics.

It would be difficult to dislike any of these tracks from an instrumental point of view. The instrumentation is stellar. Songs like “The Monster In Her Womb”, “Horizon” and the post-interlude track “Rarefaction” all stand above the rest for the diligence and skill with which they were written.

Embodying the controlled chaos atmosphere that is djent metal, “Perfect Vision” hits it’s mark with precision. Reminiscent of the manner in which bands like Periphery are able to bring harmony and melody from the seemingly disorganized and clashing sounds. It is here that Circuitry’s gem is uncovered.

In conclusion, this is an interesting and ultimately solid album. When dealing with the unorthodox style that is djent sometimes one can be unsure of exactly what they will get. But Circuitry rose to the challenge and delivered a unique and enjoyable debut album. Keep an eye on them, I believe they are sure to produce a solid sophomore album in the future.