Take 5: The Best Movie Trailers Of The Week (June 12)

Take 5: The Best Movie Trailers Of The Week (June 12)

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We love to share movie trailers. Aside from music videos, album trailers, tour teasers, and all the other video content bands typically supply us with, movie trailers are probably the thing we watch the most online. You may have noticed a few news posts with trailers in recent weeks, and you will no doubt see many more in the weeks and months ahead, but if we made a new post for every trailer that hit our inboxes we would never have time to post about anything else. So, to simplify your life and ours, we’ve compiled our five favorite trailers of the week from everything we haven’t previously covered into a single post. Enjoy!

Kicks (September 9)

This could easily be the Dope of 2016, but we’ll settle for the best coming-of-age story of the year. Filmmaker Justin Tipping appears to be going for something that blends experimental storytelling with the grit of reality. Consider us already in line for opening night.

Synopsis: In Justin Tipping’s feature debut, Kicks, nothing is as simple as it seems. 15-year-old Brandon longs for a pair of the freshest sneakers that money can buy; assuming that merely having them on his feet will help him escape the reality of being poor, neglected by the opposite sex and picked on by everyone—even his best friends. Working hard to get them, he soon finds that the titular shoes have instead made him a target after they are promptly snatched by local hood, Flaco. Seemingly the embodiment of menace, Flaco harbors complexities of his own that will be revealed when Brandon goes on a mission to retrieve his stolen sneakers with his two best friends in tow.

The Greasy Strangler (October 7 – VOD)

This is the only true competitor to Swiss Army Man for the most original film of the year. NSFW FTW.

Synopsis: This Los Angeles–set tale follows Ronnie, a man who runs a disco walking tour along with his browbeaten son, Brayden. When a sexy, alluring woman named Janet comes to take the tour, it begins a competition between father and son for her attentions. It also brings about the appearance of an oily, slimy, inhuman maniac who stalks the streets at night and strangles the innocent—soon dubbed “the Greasy Strangler.”

Embrace (Fall 2016)

91% of women worldwide hate their bodies. That is horrifying for a multitude of reasons, and Embrace looks to make a positive change. We’re all for it. Love yourself. Always.

Synopsis: When Body Image Activist Taryn Brumfitt posted an unconventional before-and-after photo in 2013 it was seen by more than 100 million people worldwide and sparked an international media frenzy. Embrace follows Taryn’s crusade as she explores the global issue of body loathing, inspiring us to change the way we feel about ourselves and think about our bodies.

The Legend Of Tarzan (July 1)

We’re still unsure whether this film will be a hit or a bomb, but we would be lying if we said the footage released so far was anything other than gorgeous. We’re curious—perhaps even optimistic—but honestly, when was the last time people truly cared about this character?

Synopsis: It has been years since the man once known as Tarzan (Alexander Skarsgård) left the jungles of Africa behind for a gentrified life as John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, with his beloved wife, Jane (Margot Robbie) at his side. Now, he has been invited back to the Congo to serve as a trade emissary of Parliament, unaware that he is a pawn in a deadly convergence of greed and revenge, masterminded by the Belgian, Leon Rom (Christoph Waltz). But those behind the murderous plot have no idea what they are about to unleash.

Eat That Question (June 24)

Frank Zappa is a rock and roll icon, but in the modern age many young people do not know his name. We have a feeling that will change after this film is released. At least, we hope that is the case.

Synopsis: It is only fitting that a comet and a mollusk are named in Frank Zappa’s honor. The famed American musician, composer, and thinker created satirical, operatic interpretations of music that seemed to originate from another world. Thorsten Schütte’s film is a sharply edited and energetic celebration of Zappa through his public persona, allowing us to witness his shifting relationship with audiences. Utilizing potent TV interviews and many forgotten performances from his 30-year career, we are immersed into the musician’s world while experiencing two distinct facets of his complex character. At once Zappa was both a charismatic composer who reveled in the joy of performing and, in the next moment, a fiercely intelligent and brutally honest interviewee whose convictions only got stronger as his career ascended.